Did AMC's The Pitch portray agency reality?

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Did AMC's The Pitch portray agency reality?

Thursday October 3rd, 2013 by Extensis

 

Screen shot 2013-10-01 at 2.53.44 PM
The Pitch AMC Series

Did you watch The Pitch?

In August and September 2013, AMC aired season 2 of The Pitch. For those of you who haven’t seen the show, each episode pits competing agencies against one another and follows their teams as they prepare to battle for a piece of new business—with only seven days to perfect their pitch. It’s a real competition shot documentary-style, featuring brands like Little Caesars Pizza and 1-800-Flowers.com.

Some folks in marketing might consider hiring an agency a necessary evil. An outside team can be a great well of creative strategy, but may carry the risk of being expensive and “excitable.” And there’s always the mysterious “creative process” that often produces the great work, but can’t be defined or revealed. The Pitch aims to the expose the “secret sauce,” which (at times) can appear a little unsettling or flat-out grueling.

Secret Sauce in the Spotlight

It looks as though it might be both excruciating and, at brief moments exhilarating to come up with a provocative idea that resonates— if the documentary is true to life. Some of the agencies sharing their esoteric ingredients on national TV include MC2, Pasadena Advertising, Neuron Syndicate and The Monogram Group. (These four agencies just happen to be customers of Extensis.)

Love or hate the show, it can’t be easy to place yourself in the spotlight while you’re trying to work. We’d like to congratulate these teams for putting themselves under the microscope and on the chopping block—at least they’re all winning publicity!

Sometimes Clients Choose People Over Ideas

Here’s an interesting perspective from Rob Goldberg, Senior Vice President for Tommy Bahama, who selected Neuron Syndicate as the winning agency during their pitch episode.

“I think what’s important when you’re going to work with an agency is that you share a lot of the same personality traits, because a brand is really a reflection of our personality,” explains Goldberg. “So in this case, we actually liked the agency more than the idea they came up with…”

See the full article.

So what did you think?

The show averaged 330,000 viewers during the first season, according to Nielsen. Ratings have declined in the second season, to about 167,000 viewers per show.

Do you think we’ll see a season three and do you think the series poses an accurate representation of the agency pitch process? Tell us in the comments below and we’ll send you some swag.

Want to watch?

Episode 202: Bliss and MC2

Episode 204: Tommy Bahama, Pasadena Advertising and Neuron Syndicate

Episode 208: The Fuller Brush Company and The Monogram Group