Just what does that font license mean to you? - part two - Converting fonts from one format to another - Extensis.com

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Just what does that font license mean to you? – part two – Converting fonts from one format to another

Tuesday May 6th, 2008 by Jim Kidwell

In this second outing into the conversation about font licenses (or End User License Agreements – EULAs) let’s explore another “outside the box” use that you might come across when working with fonts and typography.

FontLab TransType Pro can help you convert a font from format to anotherSo, what happens when you’ve purchased a license for a Postscript version of a font, and then your client/printer/whomever indicates that they only want you to use True Type fonts. You’ve already purchased a license for the font, so can you convert that font using a tool such as FontLab’s TransType and still stay within the terms of your license?

Believe it or not, some licenses will allow such conversions! Adobe® fonts are allowed to be converted from one format to another, even though some other foundries specifically prevent this type of data manipulation. When manipulating a font, whether to convert it’s format or to add a new glyph, the most important thing to remember is that you should never expect any technical assistance with the resultant font.

Adobe product manager for fonts and global typography, Thomas Phinney, confirmed Adobe’s position during a panel discussion at the recent Business of Type conference held at Microsoft this spring. That’s good news for those of us who have purchased an older copy of Adobe Font Folio® in Postscript and are aching for some font format flexibility. Heck, if you’ve got the cash, it’s probably best to just avoid font conversion issues and move your font collection over entirely to OpenType fonts.

Of course, if you have any questions about what you’re allowed to do within your own font licenses, be sure to consult with your legal advisers.